Image of Barbara Dewey and Mairaid Martin smiling sitting on orange couch

Transforming Libraries

A conversation with Barbara Dewey and Mairéad Martin on our signature orange couch

We sat down with Penn State administrators, Barbara Dewey, dean of University Libraries and Scholarly Communications, and Mairéad Martin, senior director of Digital Library Technologies, on our signature orange couch to capture a friendly exchange about how they first met (over a decade ago when they were both administrators at the University of Tennessee), and to take in a more focused conversation about their respective roles in the digital transformation of the University Libraries at Penn State.

See how the conversation unfolded in the following video segments. Or watch the complete 30-minute conversation including closed-caption and interactive transcript.

Scroll down to see how the conversation unfolded in the following video segments
image of an orange colored arrow pointing downward
or
small image of Pattee/Paterno library
Watch the complete 30-minute conversation including closed-caption and interactive transcript

Learning Spaces

The iconic Paterno “green lamp” Reading Room dates from the original 1938 construction of Pattee Library and is a replica of the New York Public Library Reading Room. The space is furnished to resemble a grand-scale, historic reading room. Barbara and Mairéad converse with each other on a couch placed in this classic space, and talk about the Libraries’ learning spaces and the challenge of keeping technology relevant while continuing to value inspiring, motivational, quiet spaces like the Paterno Reading Room. The state-of-the-art Knowledge Commons is also highlighted in this discussion.

Moving Forward

Libraries are repositories for rare, specialized physical collections and archives, which they continue to acquire, catalog, and preserve. Learn how the University Libraries are supporting the digital research enterprise at Penn State, and how they are moving forward with the transition from print to digital media – creating services that help faculty, students, and other scholars to use these newly digitized materials.

Staying Competitive

The Internet-age did not make libraries obsolete. Instead, with over two million searches on the CAT, 800,000 items in circulation, 100,000 interlibrary loans serviced, and millions of hours of desktop computing usage logged last year, it’s evident that the University Libraries are utilized now more than ever. Despite these impressive statistics, library patrons have high expectations about the technology and digital services available to them. Learn how the University Libraries is staying competitive and keeping pace with technology in an effort to resonate with students, faculty, and other scholars.

Sharing Resources

In addition to collaborating and partnering with other institutions to help foster and promote Open Access in scholarship and research, the University Libraries are also working to meet the challenges of compatibility, digital rights management, and preservation and sustainability (among other topics) in the transition from print to digital media. Learn how the Libraries are seeking creative ways to develop a successful model that provides open, digital access to all library patrons.

Leading the Way

See how Penn State is leading the way and influencing the direction of libraries, and learn more about the University’s role in strategically planning the future of higher-education research libraries.

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